Meet the Newest Board Member: Randevyn Piérre

Randevyn Piérre graphic for new board member profile

Randevyn Piérre is a business organizer, process innovator, and health messaging strategist. After high school in Colorado, Randevyn earned a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management and a Master’s degree in Business Administration from Colorado Tech. Randevyn has a diverse professional background in the business of disease prevention and treatment, program development, health promotion, health education, health marketing, project management, and community affairs. In each of these roles, he has served as a valuable team contributor to those he has worked alongside. 

More specifically, Randevyn’s public health work portfolio includes the Georgia Department of Public Health, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson.

He currently serves as Regional Director in External Affairs for ViiV Healthcare.

Q1: Introduce yourself, where do you come from and why do you want to take this important step in pursuing the end of the HIV epidemic in the South?

Over the past 15 years, I have worked for various sectors of HIV to include grassroots, government, non-profit, and commercial entities. Georgia has been my home for 20 years, and it is where I began my public health career.

 

I am interested in using the knowledge and skills I have acquired from my experiences in reducing new infections and improving the overall quality of health and wellness—specifically in the South, where my life happens.

Q2: What excites you about joining the Board of Directors of Southern AIDS Coalition?

It brings me a sense of joy and fulfillment to join others with similar passion to lead with innovation in their approach to addressing HIV; facilitating, collaborating, inspiring and co-creating to ensure a balanced & well-informed approach to improving health outcomes in a largely underserved part of our country.

Q1: Introduce yourself, where do you come from and why do you want to take this important step in pursuing the end of the HIV epidemic in the South?

Q2: What excites you about joining the Board of Directors of Southern AIDS Coalition?

Over the past 15 years, I have worked for various sectors of HIV to include grassroots, government, non-profit, and commercial entities. Georgia has been my home for 20 years, and it is where I began my public health career.

 

I am interested in using the knowledge and skills I have acquired from my experiences in reducing new infections and improving the overall quality of health and wellness—specifically in the South, where my life happens.

It brings me a sense of joy and fulfillment to join others with similar passion to lead with innovation in their approach to addressing HIV; facilitating, collaborating, inspiring and co-creating to ensure a balanced & well-informed approach to improving health outcomes in a largely underserved part of our country.

Q3: Share a moment—a policy, movement, or experience that has shaped you and deepened your commitment to work with organizations like the Southern AIDS Coalition in this fight.

When people ask how I got started in HIV, I tell them about, “church cancer,” the horrible code phrase used to describe HIV/AIDS while I was growing up in black church (when gay men would become “mysteriously” ill with advanced HIV). For years, I was frozen in fright as friends and others in my proximity who I admired suffered and died in silence and shame. At 24, I vowed to become a voice for forward thinking and change, fighting for fairness and equity in human health—and I’m still at it. 

Q4: What do you hope to accomplish as a new Board Member for the Southern AIDS Coalition?

I’d like to agitate thought around how human health is just as much about the condition of the mind and emotions (and how they are or are not nurtured) as it is the state of our bodies.

Q3: Share a moment—a policy, movement, or experience that has shaped you and deepened your commitment to work with organizations like the Southern AIDS Coalition in this fight.

Q4: What do you hope to accomplish as a new Board Member for the Southern AIDS Coalition?

When people ask how I got started in HIV, I tell them about, “church cancer,” the horrible code phrase used to describe HIV/AIDS while I was growing up in black church (when gay men would become “mysteriously” ill with advanced HIV). For years, I was frozen in fright as friends and others in my proximity who I admired suffered and died in silence and shame. At 24, I vowed to become a voice for forward thinking and change, fighting for fairness and equity in human health—and I’m still at it. 

I’d like to agitate thought around how human health is just as much about the condition of the mind and emotions (and how they are or are not nurtured) as it is the state of our bodies.

Q5: Are there any other thoughts you’d like to share about the start of your journey with the Southern AIDS Coalition family?

In addition to doing the work to “stop” HIV, it is my belief that “starting” the work around holistic health and wellness may allow SAC to take a step back and think through new ways to reimagine long-term funding sources. 

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